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Archive for February, 2007

BPMS Hype?

    IT|Redux – What is Wrong with BPM

    • This is a plug for his product, but Ismael articlulates a key problem with BPM Suites–They are not easily deployed by business without much IT coding and integration (even though vendors claim otherwise).

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BPMS Hype?

    IT|Redux – What is Wrong with BPM

    • This is a plug for his product, but Ismael articlulates a key problem with BPM Suites–They are not easily deployed by business without much IT coding and integration (even though vendors claim otherwise).

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A very useful “outside-in” approach to changing processes is to focus on mitigating the risks associated with “Moments of Truth.” I was introduced to this concept by Steve Towers of BPMG. Essentially, a Moment of Truth (MOT) occurs every time an organization interacts with a customer. The term was originally coined by Jan Carlzon in his 1987 book titled Moments of Truth. In his book, the former CEO of SAS explained that in 1986

…each of our 10 million customers came in contact with approximately five SAS employees, and this contact lasted an average of 15 seconds each time. thus, SAS is “created” 50 million times a year, 15 seconds at a time. These 50 million “moments of truth” are the moments that ultimately determine whether SAS will succeed or fail as a company. They are the moments when we must prove to our customers that SAS is their best alternative.

This concept has really helped me as I analyze processes at my organization. In all of my projects I now try to identify and optimize as many MOTs as I can find. By eliminating MOTs or at least minimizing their risks, processes become more focused on the value proposition for customers.

I found a great website called This is Broken that is dedicated to sharing broken Moments of Truth. It is a forum for people to submit and discuss broken customer experiences. The website does not call these broken interactions “Moments of Truth,” but they are essentially the same things. I found this website while I was watching this video of Seth Godin that also illustrates broken interactions between organizations and their customers.

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A very useful "outside-in" approach to changing processes is to focus on mitigating the risks associated with "Moments of Truth."   I was introduced to this concept by Steve Towers of BPMG.   Essentially, a Moment of Truth (MOT) occurs every time an organization interacts with a customer.  The term was originally coined by Jan Carlzon in his 1987 book titled Moments of Truth.   In his book, the former CEO of SAS explained that in 1986

…each of our 10 million customers came in contact with approximately five SAS employees, and this contact lasted an average of 15 seconds each time.  thus, SAS is "created" 50 million times a year, 15 seconds at a time.  These 50 million "moments of truth" are the moments that ultimately determine whether SAS will succeed or fail as a company.  They are the moments when we must prove to our customers that SAS is their best alternative.

This concept has really helped me as I analyze processes at my organization. In all of my projects I now try to identify and optimize as many MOTs as I can find.   By eliminating MOTs or at least minimizing their risks, processes become more focused on the value proposition for customers.
I found a great website called This is Broken that is dedicated to sharing broken Moments of Truth.  It is a forum for people to submit and discuss broken customer experiences.  The website does not call these broken interactions "Moments of Truth," but they are essentially the same things.  I found this website while I was watching this video of Seth Godin that also illustrates broken interactions between organizations and their customers.

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My First Blog Post

Welcome to my blog! It’s taken me a little time to get this thing started, because I just didn’t know what direction to take. After much thought, I’ve decided to write about my education and experiences regarding Business Process Management (BPM).

Recently, I took part in a perspective-changing training by Business Process Management Group (BPMG). Although, I was expecting the training to concentrate on topics like process modeling, BPM Suites, and standards, the discussion was heavily focused on how to meet the needs of the customer. They called it an “outside-in” approach. From their perspective (and now mine) the premise of BPM is that all procesess, systems, roles, and strategies of an organization must be aligned with customers’ expectations. WOW!

My goal for this blog is to take this premise and explore its implications. I plan to focus heavily on the notion of a “Successful Customer Outcomes” and my experiences of implementing BPM projects. I look forward to the discussion that this blog triggers and hope that we all can learn a little bit about increasing our companies’ abilities to meet the expectations of our customers…

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My First Blog Post

Welcome to my blog! It’s taken me a little time to get this thing started, because I just didn’t know what direction to take. After much thought, I’ve decided to write about my education and experiences regarding Business Process Management (BPM).

Recently, I took part in a perspective-changing training by Business Process Management Group (BPMG). Although, I was expecting the training to concentrate on topics like process modeling, BPM Suites, and standards, the discussion was heavily focused on how to meet the needs of the customer. They called it an “outside-in” approach. From their perspective (and now mine) the premise of BPM is that all procesess, systems, roles, and strategies of an organization must be aligned with customers’ expectations. WOW!

My goal for this blog is to take this premise and explore its implications. I plan to focus heavily on the notion of a “Successful Customer Outcomes” and my experiences of implementing BPM projects. I look forward to the discussion that this blog triggers and hope that we all can learn a little bit about increasing our companies’ abilities to meet the expectations of our customers…

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